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publications

Avian influenza surveillance in wild migratory, resident, domestic birds and in poultry in Maharashtra and Manipur, India, during avian migratory season 2006–2007.

Published in Current Science, 2009

Abstract

India reported outbreaks of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) H5N1 in poultry in the states of Maharashtra, Gujarat and Madhya Pradesh (February–April 2006); Manipur (July 2007); West Bengal (January 2008) and Tripura (April 2008). The role of migratory birds in the transmission of the HPAI H5N1 remains a subject of debate. Avian Influenza (AI) surveillance in wild migratory, wild resident, domestic birds and poultry was undertaken by National Institute of Virology (NIV) jointly with Ela Foundation, Pune, India during 2006–07. A total of 1968 faecal specimens (1369 droppings from wild migratory and wild resident birds; 474 droppings from poultry and 125 cloacal swabs from chickens and ducks) were collected. These samples representing 10 avian families of wild migratory birds, four families of wild resident birds totalling 36 species, were from eight districts of Maharashtra covering 20 water bodies and two districts of Manipur. The samples were screened for AI viruses by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), real-time PCR and were processed for virus isolation in embryonated chicken eggs and cell culture. Two samples from wild ducks were positive for viruses other than AI, newcastle disease virus (NDV) and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). During the study period no sample was positive for Influenza A viruses, Influenza A (H5N1) or any other strain of HPAI by RT-PCR and virus isolation. In view of the recent HPAI H5N1 outbreaks in poultry in India, continued and more widespread AI surveillance is necessary to elucidate the role of wild migratory, resident, domestic birds and poultry in the transmission of AI viruses.

Recommended citation: Pawar, Shailesh., Satish Pande, Aniruddha Jamgaonkar, S. S. Koratkar, Bishwajoy Pal, Satish Raut, Madhuri Nanaware., Koninika Ray, Alok Chakrabarti, Sadhana Kode, Vishal Thite, Madhukar Khude, Satish Randive, Atanu Basu, Amit Pawashe, Aditya Ponkshe, Pranav Pandit and Pramod Deshpande "Avian influenza surveillance in wild migratory, resident, domestic birds and in poultry in Maharashtra and Manipur, India, during avian migratory season 2006–2007." Curr. Sci 97 (2009): 550-554 http://www.jstor.org/stable/24111884

Behavioural and virological studies on a rescued Oriental white-backed vulture Gyps bengalensis from western Maharashtra, India.

Published in Journal of Threatened Taxa , 2011

Abstract

An exhausted Indian White-backed Vulture Gyps bengalensis was rescued in Maharashtra State, India. Examination revealed that it was not injured but was emaciated due to starvation. The vulture was fed in captivity by the Forest Department. To rule out the possibility of viral infections, cloacal, tracheal and serum samples were collected from the vulture. They were negative for Avian Influenza (AI) viruses, Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV), Infectious Bursal Disease Virus by virus isolation. We observed neck drooping behavior by vulture when approached by humans. The vulture flew away but after two days, was found dead 60km away, due to electrocution. Our report suggests that electrocution may also be an explanation for the decreasing numbers of vultures in India.

Recommended citation: Pande, Satish, Pandit Pranav, Ponkshe Aditya, Mone Ram, Pawar Shailesh, and Mishra Akhilesh. "Behavioural and virological studies on a rescued Oriental white-backed vulture Gyps bengalensis from western Maharashtra, India." Journal of Threatened Taxa 3, no. 1 (2011): 1490-1492. http://threatenedtaxa.org/index.php/JoTT/article/view/1202/2174

Avian collision threat assessment at ‘Bhambarwadi Wind Farm Plateau’in northern Western Ghats, India.

Published in Journal of Threatened Taxa, 2013

Abstract

To address the shortage of power in India, wind energy is increasingly harnessed as an alternate and renewable energy source. There is a rapid increase in the number of wind farms at suitable sites all over the country. Some of the key sites with optimal wind velocities are the plateaus on the Western Ghats - a global hotspot of biological diversity. The rocky plateaus on the Western Ghats are terrestrial habitat islands facing extreme micro-environmental conditions; however, scanty information is available on the ecology of these plateaus. We undertook a two-year study to assess the impact of wind farms on birds. We also documented the avian diversity at Bhambarwadi Plateau, northern Western Ghats, India. To the best of our knowledge this is the first such study in India. We recorded 89 avian species on the plateau, 27 of which flew in the risk area swept by the rotor blades, and hence are potentially at risk of collision. The collision index (the number of bird collisions with wind turbines over a period of one year assuming that the birds do not take any avoidance measure) for these species were estimated. We also identified species at risk from collision with transformers and wind-masts, and at risk from electrocution. Reduction in avian activity in the study area was evident with progress of wind farm erection. Despite the small footprint of an individual wind turbine, the associated infrastructure development causes wider habitat modification and destruction resulting in a displacement effect. Therefore, wind farm erections in strategic locations such as biodiversity hotspots should be subject to prior site based strategic environmental assessments (SEA) as well as environmental impact assessment (EIA) studies.
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Recommended citation: Pande, Satish, Anand Padhye, Aditya Ponkshe, Pranav Pandit, Amit Pawashe, Shivkumar Pednekar, Rohan Pandit, and Pramod Deshpande. "Avian collision threat assessment at ‘Bhambarwadi Wind Farm Plateau’in northern Western Ghats, India." Journal of Threatened Taxa 5, no. 1 (2013): 3504-3515. http://threatenedtaxa.org/index.php/JoTT/article/view/1419/2594

Modeling highly pathogenic avian influenza transmission in wild birds and poultry in West Bengal, India.

Published in Scientific Reports volume 3, 2013

Abstract

Wild birds are suspected to have played a role in highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 outbreaks in West Bengal. Cluster analysis showed that H5N1 was introduced in West Bengal at least 3 times between 2008 and 2010. We simulated the introduction of H5N1 by wild birds and their contact with poultry through a stochastic continuous-time mathematical model. Results showed that reducing contact between wild birds and domestic poultry, and increasing the culling rate of infected domestic poultry communities will reduce the probability of outbreaks. Poultry communities that shared habitat with wild birds or those indistricts with previous outbreaks were more likely to suffer an outbreak. These results indicate that wild birds can introduce HPAI to domestic poultry and that limiting their contact at shared habitats together with swift culling of infected domestic poultry can greatly reduce the likelihood of HPAI outbreaks.
Download paper here

Recommended citation: Pranav Pandit, David Bunn, Satish Pande, and Sharif Aly. "Modeling highly pathogenic avian influenza transmission in wild birds and poultry in West Bengal, India." Scientific reports 3 (2013). https://www.nature.com/articles/srep02175

Spread of Coxiella burnetii between dairy cattle herds in an enzootic region: modelling contributions of airborne transmission and trade

Published in Veterinary Research, 2016

Abstract

Q fever, a worldwide zoonotic disease caused by Coxiella burnetii, is a looming concern for livestock and public health. Epidemiological features of inter-herd transmission of C. burnetii in cattle herds by wind and trade of cows are poorly understood. We present a novel dynamic spatial model describing the inter-herd regional spread of C. burnetii in dairy cattle herds, quantifying the ability of airborne transmission and animal trade in C. burnetii propagation in an enzootic region. Among all the new herd infections, 92% were attributed to airborne transmission and the rest to cattle trade. Infections acquired following airborne transmission were shown to cause relatively small and ephemeral intra-herd outbreaks. On the contrary, disease-free herds purchasing an infectious cow experienced significantly higher intra-herd prevalence. The results also indicated that, for short duration, both transmission routes were independent from each other without any synergistic effect. The model outputs applied to the Finistère department in western France showed satisfactory sensitivity (0.71) and specificity (0.80) in predicting herd infection statuses at the end of one year in a neighbourhood of 3 km around expected incident herds, when compared with data. The model developed here thus provides important insights into the spread of C. burnetii between dairy cattle herds and paves the way for implementation and assessment of control strategies.

Recommended citation: Pranav Pandit, Thierry Hoch, Pauline Ezanno, François Beaudeau, and Elisabeta Vergu. "Spread of Coxiella burnetii between dairy cattle herds in an enzootic region: modelling contributions of airborne transmission and trade." Veterinary Research. 47, no. 1 (2016): 1 https://veterinaryresearch.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13567-016-0330-4

Use of RFID technology to characterize feeder visitations and contact network of hummingbirds in urban habitats

Published in PLOS ONE, 2018

Recommended citation: Ruta Bandivadekar, Pranav Pandit, Rahel Sollmann, Michael Thomas, Scott Logan, Jennifer Brown, A.P. Klimley, Lisa Tell. "Use of RFID technology to characterize feeder visitations and contact network of hummingbirds in urban habitats" PLOS ONE, 13, no.12, (2018), e0208057. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0208057 https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0208057

Emerging viral spillover vulnerability at the rodent-human interface in the informal urban settlements of Nepal.

Published in under review, 2018

Abstract

Manuscript is under review.
Page will be updated as soon as the paper is published.

Recommended citation: David Wolking, Dibesh Karmacharya, Manisha Bista, Sulochana Manandhar, Bishwo Shrestha, Ajay Sharma, Shailendra Bajracharya, Tarka Bhatta, Santosh Dulal, Rajesh Rajbhandari, Pranav Pandit, Jonna Mazet, Tracey Goldstein, Christine Johnson. "Emerging viral spillover vulnerability at the rodent-human interface in the informal urban settlements of Nepal." Under review.

Predicting wildlife reservoirs and global vulnerability to zoonotic Flaviviruses

Published in Nature Communications, Accepted, In Press, 2018

Abstract

Flaviviruses continue to cause globally relevant epidemics and have emerged or re-emerged in regions that were previously unaffected. Factors determining emergence of flaviviruses and continuing circulation in sylvatic cycles are incompletely understood. Here we identify potential sylvatic reservoirs of flaviviruses and characterize the macro-ecological traits common to known wildlife hosts to predict the risk of sylvatic flavivirus transmission among wildlife and identify regions that could be vulnerable to outbreaks. We evaluate variability in wildlife hosts for zoonotic flaviviruses and find that flaviviruses group together in distinct clusters with similar hosts. Models incorporating ecological and climatic variables as well as life history traits shared by flaviviruses predict new host species with similar host characteristics. The combination of vector distribution data with models for flavivirus hosts allows for prediction of global vulnerability to flaviviruses and provides potential targets for disease surveillance in animals and humans.

Recommended citation: Pranav Pandit, Megan Doyle, Katrina Smart, Cristin Young, Gaylen Drape, and Christine Johnson. "Predicting wildlife reservoirs and global vulnerability to zoonotic Flaviviruses" Nature Communications, 9.

talks

teaching

MAN-IMAL Program - Summer School 2013

Summer School, ONIRIS École Nationale Vétérinaire, Agroalimentaire et de l'Alimentation, Nantes, 2013

Topic: Presented activities of our lab ‘UMR BioEpAR – INRA’ and conducted a workshop for outbreak investigation.

Basic Epidemiology

Master MAN-IMAL One Health Program, ONIRIS École Nationale Vétérinaire, Agroalimentaire et de l'Alimentation,, 2014

Topic: Sampling in descriptive study.

PHR 277/ EPI277 Mathematical models in epidemiology

Teaching, School of Veterinary Medicine, UC Davis, 2016

Topic: Modelling Disease Latency & Heterogeneity.
The course is based Matlab coding environment.
On student demand, I demonstrated modelling in ‘Python’ and ‘R’ coding environment.

PHR 277/ EPI277 Mathematical models in epidemiology

Teaching, School of Veterinary Medicine, UC Davis, 2016

Topic: Modelling Disease Latency & Heterogeneity.
The course is based Matlab coding environment.
On student demand, I demonstrated modelling in ‘Python’ and ‘R’ coding environment.

EcoHealthNet 2.0: A One Health approach to disease ecology research & education.

Mentorship, School of Veterinary Medicine, UC Davis, 2017

Topic: EcoHealthNet 2.0.
A NSF funded program for undergraduate and graduate-level global research coordination network to bring together world-class research scientists.
Mentored an undergraduate and a graduate student working on projects related to emerging infectious diseases.
https://www.ecohealthalliance.org/program/ecohealthnet